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The kingly crown : newly translated with an introduction and notes / by Bernard Lewis [Texte imprimé]

Auteur principal: ʾIbn Gabiyrwl, Šelomoh, 1021-1070Auteur secondaire: Lewis, Bernard, 1916-....Langue: anglais ; de l'oeuvre originale, hébreu.Pays: GrandeBretagne.Publication : London : Vallentine, Mitchell, cop. 1961Description : 1 vol. (91 pages) ; 23 cmDewey: 892.41Résumé: The Kingly Crown is the greatest of Gabirol's poems. Its theme is the problem of the human predicament: the frailty of man and his proclivity to sin, in tension with a benign providence that must leave room for the operation of man's free will and also make available to him the means of penitence. The Kingly Crown is still printed in prayerbooks of the Sephardic rite for the Day of Atonement, and among North African Jewish communities (and their offshoots in Israel and elsewhere) it is read communally before the morning service of the Day. In northern Europe and the West this custom has lapsed, however the Kingly Crown is still used for private penitential reading.Bibliographie: Bibliogr. pages 69-70.Sujet - Auteur/titre: Ibn Gabirol, active 11th century | Salomon ben Yehûdah ibn Gabirol (1021?-1070), Keter Malkhut Sujet - Nom commun: Cabala | Mysticism -- Judaism -- Poetry | Jewish philosophy -- Poetry Autre édition : Ibn Gabirol, approximately 1022-approximately 1070. Kingly crown.
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Bibliothèque Damas
Magasin
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Solomon ibn Gabirol (ca. 1021 - ca. 1058) was the greatest of the Spanish Jewish poets and an important neoplatonist philosopher. Translated into Latin in the mid-twelfth century, his philosophical work became influential among scholars who were unaware that "Avicebron" (as his last name was Latinized) was a Jew and a celebrated writer of religious hymns

Bibliogr. pages 69-70

The Kingly Crown is the greatest of Gabirol's poems. Its theme is the problem of the human predicament: the frailty of man and his proclivity to sin, in tension with a benign providence that must leave room for the operation of man's free will and also make available to him the means of penitence. The Kingly Crown is still printed in prayerbooks of the Sephardic rite for the Day of Atonement, and among North African Jewish communities (and their offshoots in Israel and elsewhere) it is read communally before the morning service of the Day. In northern Europe and the West this custom has lapsed, however the Kingly Crown is still used for private penitential reading